Water Is Life
THE STATISTICS ARE STAGGERING. 

Many of us take for granted our faucets, water bottles, drinking fountains and flowing water. Can you believe the majority of our toilet bowls contain purer water than the murky, disease-infested water that is currently available to over a billion people?  Check out a few startling facts below;                                                   
  • Diarrhea is one of the leading causes of death among children under 5 in the world
  • Around 1.5 deaths each year - nearly one in five - are caused by diarrhea.
  • 780 million people don't have access to clean water
  • Every 21 seconds, a child dies from diarrhea.
  • An estimated 4,100 children under the age of five die each day from diarrhea globally
  • 90% of the deaths due to diarrheal disease are children under 5 years old
  • Addittional improvement of drinking water quality, such as point of use disinfection, would lead to a reduction of diaarhea episodes of 45%
How does this effect education, economy and community life?
  • Woman and girls often spend up to 6 hours each day fetching water - 200 million hours a day.
  • 50% of schools in the world don't have fresh water or adequate sanitation
  • Reducing the distance to a water source from 30 to 15 minutes will increase girls school attendance by 12%
  • Additional improvement of drinking water quality, such as point of use disinfection, would lead to a reduction of diarrhea episodes of 45%
  • With the same access to productive resources as men - including water - women could increase yields on their farms 20-30% and lift 150 million people out of hunger
  • 443 million school days are lost each year due to water-related illnesses that keep children out of school and compromise their ability to learn.
Do you want to help?  CLICK HERE to donate filtration Straws that can save the life of a child for up to one year. Or, CLICK HERE to find out what else you can do to help make a difference right away.  
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References - 
 
Progress on Sanitation and Drinking-Water, 2012 Update. WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) for Water Supply and Sanitation. (2012).